Pattern Review: Retro Sweatpants

It is cold and snowy here, but my blogging backlog means I get to bring you a couple of photos from the last sunny days of fall.

This is the free Retro Sweatpants Pattern by Elegance & Elephants, available in sizes 12m to 9. I made size 6. I used leftover fabric for this project bringing the total cost to 0$.

The Retro Sweatpants pattern by Elegance & Elephants, as sewn by The Finished Garment.
What our backyard looked like this fall. Right now we have a couple of feet of snow on the ground. Green grass – remember that! (sigh) Me either.

The pants are interlock, leftover from some shorts I made my husband, and the cuffs are jersey, leftover from another project. The interlock is very soft inside, so they are the go-to comfy pants for Kid No 2.

I skipped the drawstring since Kid No 2 doesn’t like anything fussy, and the pockets. That made this pattern super quick to sew. Free, easy, super soft – what’s not to like?

The Retro Sweatpants pattern by Elegance & Elephants, as sewn by The Finished Garment.
The pants are black, so they are a bit hard to photograph.

Project Summary

Pattern: Retro Sweatpants Pattern by Elegance & Elephants, available in sizes 12m to 9. I made size 6.
Fabric: Sweatshirt fabric.
Cost:Pattern: free. Fabric: $0 (leftover from other projects).
Project Sewing Level: Beginner.
Modifications: I skipped the pockets and drawstring.
Results: Quick, easy sewing.

Neon Blue Mini Hudson

This year, my only boxing day shopping took place at the fabric shop. I didn’t find much, but there was some gorgeous french terry in a neon turquoise for only 5$ a metre.

I wasn’t sure what to make so I let the kids decide and Kid No 2 and Kid No 4 chose pants. I didn’t have much in the way of knit pant patterns, especially not for fabric this thick, so I bought the Mini Hudson Pant pattern from True Bias.

Mini Hudson Pant sewing pattern from True Bias as sewn by The Finished Garment.
These were a really quick project.

There is a Mini Hudson blog hop going on at the moment if you want to see more versions. I’m not part of it, but since everyone is posting their mini hudsons, and I just made these last week, I figured I’d hurry up and post mine too. You’ll have to excuse me for showing up to the party uninvited.

Mini Hudson Pant sewing pattern from True Bias as sewn by The Finished Garment.
I made the size 7 and size 3.

This pattern makes a drawstring pant that works well with heavier fabric and is cut narrower near the ankle and wider at the hips. I used jersey scraps from two previous projects (coming soon to the blog) in black for my son and hot pink for my daughter. The pink and blue combo is a little bright, but if you can’t wear neon turquoise and hot pink when you are two, when can you?

The pants ended up a little big, but that’s a bonus in my book. The hipster styling isn’t quite as obvious for now, but it won’t be long before the kids grow up an inch or so.

Mini Hudson Pant sewing pattern from True Bias as sewn by The Finished Garment.
I used french terry for the pants and jersey for the trim.

These are really quick to sew and pretty foolproof. The only modification I made was to leave off the drawstring. Kid No 2 doesn’t like fiddly closures, even when they are just decorative and Kid No 4, at two-years-old, doesn’t need the hazard factor. And the only thing I would change in the future would be to make the waistband a bit wider, but just because I like that look.

Once again, these went right into regular circulation and so I didn’t get quite as many photos of the larger pants as I would have liked. My smaller kid was quite happy to mug it up for the camera though.

Mini Hudson Pant sewing pattern from True Bias as sewn by The Finished Garment.
So silly!

Summary

Pattern Review: Mini Hudson Pant from True Bias, available in sizes 2T-10.
Fabric: 

  • Neon turquoise french terry.
  • Cotton spandex jersey in black and fuchsia by Stenzo.

Size: 3 and 7.
Cost: Pattern: $8. Fabric: About $5 per pair of pants.
Sewing Level: Beginner.
Modifications: I left out the drawstring.
Results: Cute and comfy.

Mini Hudson Pant sewing pattern from True Bias as sewn by The Finished Garment.
These are really warm and comfy.

And Now for Something Completely Different…

I’ve been tackling the unfinished object (UFO) pile and I’m down to zero UFO quilt projects (woot! woot!), four kids projects (three for Halloween), and let’s just agree not to talk about my pile, shall we? So it was clearly time for a new category of sewing projects: men’s wear!

These are Vogue 8889 and Vogue 8890, which I am making for Mr Garment. I’ll be making the shirt and pants but not the jacket. Well, one day the jacket, but not anytime soon.

Vogue 8889 (men's shirt) and Vogue 8890 (men's pants and jacket)
Vogue 8889 (men’s shirt) and Vogue 8890 (men’s pants and jacket)

I had planned to make this a surprise and had bought some grey shirting, but when  I showed it to Mr Garment, he was not too impressed. Not his style it seems. So we all headed out to the fabric store and he chose some plain black shirting, another shirting fabric which is much nicer in a purple stripe and some grey wool for the pants in Vogue 9980 in a (slight) stretch wool.

The second one is the grey that Mr Garment did not care for. The other three are his choices.
The second one is the grey that Mr Garment did not care for. The other three are his choices.

Mr Garment has a corporate job and likes a nice suit. His style runs conservative, but he likes European-cut clothes, and isn’t afraid of a little colour.

A close up so you can see the fabrics a little better.
A close up so you can see the fabrics a little better.

I’m starting with Vogue 8889, which is described as a “loose-fitting shirt has collar, collar band, self-lined yoke with forward shoulder seams, side front/side back seams, flat-fell seams, shaped hemline and narrow hem.” I will be making version C.

I’ve already made one muslin. I made it out of some stash fabric I had bought years ago for a craft project. It is crazy and I did not insist on photos, because I am not that mean. I used this fabric because I really had no idea what size to start with – I’ve only made Mr Garment Halloween costumes before – and didn’t want to waste good fabric.

My muslin. Anyone in the mood to watch a musical about a coat?
My crazy muslin. Anyone in the mood to watch a musical about a coat?

I cut a 44,  and so far the fit is really nice. Despite being billed as “loose-fitting”, it is actually fairly fitted. The shirt is made with side panels, which resemble princess seams (ahem) manly seams which allow for a really nice shape. Mr Garment likes a fitted, European-style, tailored shirt, so this is good. The sleeves are the right length as well. The shirt length is also good (Mr Garment is 5’11”). But the shoulders are too wide, and Mr Garment is a fairly wide-shouldered guy.

Peter Lapin of Male Pattern Boldness has several blog posts on this particular pattern which are very helpful. He narrowed the yoke by an inch on each side, but I only need to do this by 1/2 an inch per side. He shows his pattern modifications on his blog, so if you are thinking of trying this pattern, it’s definitely worth taking a look. You can see two finished versions of the shirt in this post.

You can also see some nice versions of this shirt, on other blogs, here, here, and here.

Next I’ll have to check the collar, and then I’ll cut out the black shirt.

Babies in Baby Cord

I have had about 5 meters of chocolate brown baby corduroy in my fabric stash just taunting me. A quick intervention was required.

Enter 4 pairs of the Oliver + S Sandbox Pants.

Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Three pair of Sandbox Pants by Oliver + S, sizes 5, 3T and 18m.

I know I said there were four pairs. Kid № 1 looked, touched, and immediately put them on. She then declared them officially comfortable and wore them to school. Success! (But no photos).

Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S, size 3.
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Back pockets, without buttons, on the Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S.
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Front pocket of the Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S.

The fabric is a dark chocolate brown, and really quite soft. I picked it up on sale at one of the local chain stores. It’s not a very spring-like fabric, but here in Montreal spring is still a long way off. The pockets are lined with Kona quilting cotton in brown. Both fabrics were on sale.

Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Pant hem of the Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S.

The Sandbox Pants, like all the Oliver + S patterns I’ve tried, are a dream to make. The instructions are great. I bought the paper version of this pattern, in both size ranges (I need all the sizes), on Etsy from Plum Project Studio. I think I bought it right after the paper version was discontinued. You can still get the digital version online and print it out at home.

Oliver and S Sandbox Pants
Oliver + S Sandbox Pants sewing pattern.

I made these in sizes 18m, 3T, 5 and 6. Making that many pairs in that many sizes requires a lot of tracing paper! On the other hand, you get pretty quick at them with that much practice. It’s like an intense pattern testing setup here.

Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S, size 18m.
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S, size 3.

I made a couple of small changes to the pattern. I left off the buttons on the back pockets. I also made the waistband out of corduroy (the pattern calls for coordinating quilting cotton). I had tried this pattern once before with a super heavy twill, and the cotton was just too flimsy for the pants fabric. Even though the baby corduroy is much lighter weight that the twill, I think the pants work better with a slightly heavier fabric in the waistband. I still used quilting cotton for the pocket linings though. I also switched the drawstring waist for a flat front pant with wider elastic in the back. I think it looks a bit nicer that way with the corduroy.

Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Flat waistband on the Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S.

I plan to make this pattern again. I’ve already had a request for these as shorts in a brighter colour from Kid № 1. Again, success!

The other thing about making so many pairs of pants, is that you can really use the fabric very efficiently. I still had enough to make Colette Pattern‘s Ginger skirt. Hopefully I can get that hemmed and show you tomorrow. I’m pretty excited about it. And there’s even enough fabric left to make a skirt for one lucky kid, as soon as I get to it.

You can also find this in the Make It Wear It Thursday linkup.

Summary

Pattern Review: Sandbox Pants by Oliver + S.

Fabric: baby corduroy, with Kona quilting cotton in brown for the pocket lining. Both were on sale.

Sizes: 18m, 3T, 5, and 6.

Sewing Level: Intermediate.

Modifications: I made the waistband in corduroy, not quilting cotton, changed the waist from a drawstring to a flat front, and left off the buttons on the back pockets.

Results: Great. I would recommend this pattern and will definitely make it again.

Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S
Sandbox Pants by Oliver and S, size 18m.