What size is my kid? Rough size chart equivalents for sewists

A rough guide to how children’s ready-to-wear clothing sizes and US and European sewing pattern sizes match up.
What size is my child? A guide for sewists.

A while ago I made a comparison chart of sizing systems for women. But I thought it would also be useful to do the same thing for children’s sizes.

This is a rough guide to how children’s clothing sizes and sewing pattern sizes match up across the most commonly used clothing systems. Please click to enlarge. For more details, please read the notes below.

A rough guide to how children’s ready-to-wear clothing sizes and US and European sewing pattern sizes match up.
Size chart equivalents for kids – Includes ready-to-wear and sewing pattern sizes.

Download the Rough Size Chart Equivalents for Kids as a PDF (29 kb)

How This Chart Was Built

Where does this information come from?

I used the combined available size charts from major pattern manufacturers, clothing manufacturers and international size standards. The ‘Big Four’ pattern companies refer to companies like Butterick, McCalls, Vogue and Simplicity. The European Pattern companies include ones like Ottobre and Burdastyle, but also a number of pattern companies in France, Germany, etc.  I didn’t include independent pattern company size charts, which vary a great deal, especially in the U.S.

Should I choose my pattern size based on this chart?

Probably not. It’s always a good idea to read the measurements that come with a specific pattern for a better fit.

Why are some sizes greyed out?

The greyed out sizes are purely fictitious. They don’t exist on the size charts of certain manufacturers.

What’s going on with sizes S,M and L?

Those sizes are very approximate, and vary greatly among clothing manufacturers. In addition there is a range of S-L for babies and another for older children.

Do you have suggestions? complaints?

I hope you find the chart useful. If you have any comments or would like to suggest improvements, I’d love to hear about it! Please leave your thoughts in the comments.

Pattern Review: Retro Sweatpants

It is cold and snowy here, but my blogging backlog means I get to bring you a couple of photos from the last sunny days of fall.

This is the free Retro Sweatpants Pattern by Elegance & Elephants, available in sizes 12m to 9. I made size 6. I used leftover fabric for this project bringing the total cost to 0$.

The Retro Sweatpants pattern by Elegance & Elephants, as sewn by The Finished Garment.
What our backyard looked like this fall. Right now we have a couple of feet of snow on the ground. Green grass – remember that! (sigh) Me either.

The pants are interlock, leftover from some shorts I made my husband, and the cuffs are jersey, leftover from another project. The interlock is very soft inside, so they are the go-to comfy pants for Kid No 2.

I skipped the drawstring since Kid No 2 doesn’t like anything fussy, and the pockets. That made this pattern super quick to sew. Free, easy, super soft – what’s not to like?

The Retro Sweatpants pattern by Elegance & Elephants, as sewn by The Finished Garment.
The pants are black, so they are a bit hard to photograph.

Project Summary

Pattern: Retro Sweatpants Pattern by Elegance & Elephants, available in sizes 12m to 9. I made size 6.
Fabric: Sweatshirt fabric.
Cost:Pattern: free. Fabric: $0 (leftover from other projects).
Project Sewing Level: Beginner.
Modifications: I skipped the pockets and drawstring.
Results: Quick, easy sewing.

Hear Me on Canadian Quilt Talk

I’m in a podcast! A little while ago Brandy Lynn got in touch and asked me if I wanted to be part of Canadian Quilt Talk.

She explains on her website that “Canadian Quilt Talk is a weekly online podcast that aims to inspire quilters and fibre artists alike with tips, tricks and the latest products.”

Apparently she saw one of my Big Lists online and thought it was an interesting resource and so we set up a Skype call and did an interview and you can check it out today beginning at 4 p.m. PST/7 p.m. EST.

If you are coming here after hearing the podcast then you might want to head right to one of my Big Lists.

And after hearing the podcast, you might be curious about how I use an app to keep track of my fabric stash. You can find that here. And if you are looking for some of my quilts, you can find those here.

Brandy Lynn is incredibly nice and recording the podcast was a lot of fun. Her podcasts air every week and I highly recommend checking them out.

Valentine’s Day Sewing

This fall, when I made my kids t-shirts there was a lot of extra fabric. So I decided to take all the leftover fabric and make some matching hats for everyone and skirts for the girls.

Slouch beanie sewing pattern from Brindille & Twig, sewn by The Finished Garment.
These kids are always being silly!

I used the Slouch Beanie by Brindille & Twig. It’s a very simple, fast easy project, but the results are just sooooo cute! My kids look like little elves.

Slouch beanie sewing pattern from Brindille & Twig, sewn by The Finished Garment.
Ack! Just like an elf.

The hats are reversible, and they can be worn, as designed, like slouchy skater beanies. It’s great when mum is doing the styling. But my kids usually fold up the bottoms and wear them that way.

Slouch beanie sewing pattern from Brindille & Twig, sewn by The Finished Garment.
How I style their hats.
Slouch beanie sewing pattern from Brindille & Twig, sewn by The Finished Garment.
How the kids style their hats.

The skirt pattern is from Collection privée filles & garçons by Atsuko Maruyama and Noriko Onoda (a French translation of the Japanese pattern book シンプル&デサイン おんなの子服 おとこの子服 ). The book contains 27 patterns available in sizes 90-140 cm. I made the “#12 Jupe – legging” (skirt with leggings) in sizes 120, 110, and 90.

Slouch beanie sewing pattern from Brindille & Twig, sewn by The Finished Garment.
The red skirts are cute.

The pattern comes with attached capri leggings, which are adorable. But here in the land of Hoth, where tights are pretty much required for six months of the year, they seemed a bit impractical, so I left them out.

Both patterns were super quick projects and I made the hats in a day and the skirts in another.

Project Summary

Patterns:

  • Slouch Beanie by Brindille & Twig, available in sizes preemie to 6T. I made sizes 5/6 (not shown), 3/4 and 2/3.
  • Skirt: from Collection privée filles & garçons by Atsuko Maruyama and Noriko Onoda (a French translation of the Japanese pattern book シンプル&デサイン おんなの子服 おとこの子服 ). The book contains 27 patterns available in sizes 90-140 cm. I made the “#12 Jupe – legging” (skirt with leggings) in sizes 120 (not shown), 110, and 90.

Fabric: Jersey.
Cost: Hat pattern: 4.50$. Skirt: 0$ (used for another project). Fabric: $0 (leftover from other projects).
Project Sewing Level: Beginner.
Modifications: For the skirt, I did not include the leggings.
Results: Fun, easy sewing.

Slouch beanie sewing pattern from Brindille & Twig, sewn by The Finished Garment.
My kids’ version of “cheese”.

Turquoise Skater Dresses

In the after-holiday sales I picked up some really bright turquoise French terry. It was only 5$ per metre so I let each kid choose there own piece of clothing. Two chose mini-hudson pants, and two chose the Little Girls’ Skater Dress by Kitschy Coo.

Little Girls' Skater Dress sewing pattern from Kitschy Coo, sewn by The Finished Garment.
This is the size 5/6.

I had been looking at the Skater Dress pattern for a while, but didn’t really have the right fabric. Ideally this would be made in jersey, but I thought the French terry be a little cozier. The dress ends up being great for our current cold weather, but still fun to wear and very comfortable. This French terry has a lot of stretch, which makes the dress very wearable, especially for kids.  It’s like your favourite sweatshirt, but it’s a dress.

Unfortunately, it’s been too cold for outdoor photo sessions and the light hasn’t been great lately generally, so you’ll have to settle for less than ideal photos this time around.

Little Girls' Skater Dress sewing pattern from Kitschy Coo, sewn by The Finished Garment.
This is the size 7/8.

I let the kids choose the colour of the contrast cuffs from my scrap bin. The cuffs are so bright, but they do really make the dress. With solid colours for the main part of the dress, they might be a bit plain, without that crazy pop of colour.

Little Girls' Skater Dress sewing pattern from Kitschy Coo, sewn by The Finished Garment.
Kid No 1 chose hot pink cuffs.

The pattern is sized to fit over two years. They fit a bit large. My kids are both at the lower ends of their ranges, but definitely too big to go down a size. I double checked the measurements, and tried the size 5/6 on my normally size 7 kid to check. Next time I might take the dress in a little through the bodice for my skinny girls, especially if I use a heavier fabric again. In jersey, it would probably be fine.

Little Girls' Skater Dress sewing pattern from Kitschy Coo, sewn by The Finished Garment.
Kid No 3 chose bright red cuffs.

This pattern is a really quick sew. I finished both dresses in an afternoon. The instructions were great and everything came together without any problems. I also have the women’s version of the skater dress, so I’m pretty excited to get to that soon.

Little Girls' Skater Dress sewing pattern from Kitschy Coo, sewn by The Finished Garment.
The dress is on the big size, but is supposed to last two years.

Project Summary

Pattern Review: Little Girls’ Skater Dress by Kitschy Coo, available in sizes 18m-8Y (in 4 different sizes).
Fabric: French terry, with jersey cuffs.
Sizes: 5/6 and 7/8.
Cost: Pattern: About 14$. Fabric: $5 per dress.
Project Sewing Level: Beginner.
Modifications: none.
Results: Great. The kids love wearing these.